Somewhere in between

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Miss nothing, read everything!

"To know and not to know, to be conscious of complete truthfulness while telling carefully constructed lies, to hold simultaneously two opinions which cancelled out, knowing them to be contradictory and believing in both of them,.. Even to understand the word - doublethink - involved the use of doublethink." - "Nineteen Eighty-Four" George Orwell.

Words in our life are of great and tremendous value. We show our inner world (soul) and shape our outer (outside) world by words. 

What are we doing when us not enough words so that to reveal your soul for other people? 

Some of us so brave that create new words! 

How new words are formed? 

The our world changes quickly and in our languages new words appeared.

All languages must to express new concepts and things. 

People who lived before Christ have not of the mobile phone and did not need such word.

People was created new words when they was need it

"E.g. suddenly there is an object or a phenomenon that did not exist before. It needs a name because people do not want to use long sentences to describe it. Coffee feels easier than a hot beverage from Arabian lands that makes you energetic and happy.” https://www.quora.com/Why-are-new-words-created

The scientists-linguistics talks that a majority of the words used in English today are of foreign origin. 

A neologism (niːˈɒlədʒɪzəm; from Greek νέο- néo-, new and λόγος lógos, speech, utterance) is a relatively recent or isolated term, word, or phrase which fully accepted into mainstream language and gradually transformed into a real-life "linguistic being.”

Neologisms are usually introduced when it is found that a specific notion is lacking a term, or when the existing vocabulary lacks detail, or when a speaker is unaware of the existing vocabulary. 

A lot of writers use neologisms in their art. 

New words appear on the basis of already existing words and morphemes as a rule


So who decides to live or not to live new words in real world? 

The speakers do, of course! 

The speakers will decide what words will be acceptable.


Here are some of the creators of new words (here are some words):

People talks that William Shakespeare created many new words.

When he was need for some word, he invented it.

The Oxford English Dictionary talk that he come up over 1000 words.

Some of words that Shakespeare invented are foppish, dewdrop, lacklustre, swagger, hint, critic, lonely, base, proud, shallow, beggarly, three-suited-pound, filthy woosted-stocking, a lilly-livered, action-taking, glasse-gazing, super-seruiceable, rogue and many-many others;

John Milton gave us lovelorn, fragrance, pandemonium, debauchery, terrific, healthy etc;

Geoffrey Chaucer: universe, approach;

Ben Jonson: rant, petulant;

John Donne: self-preservation, valediction;

Thomas More: atonement, anticipate, utopia;

Murray Gell-Mann: quark;

Kayla Newman: fleek;

Joycean Ulysses: broadshouldered, deepchested, stronglimbed, frankeyedfreely, freckled, shaggy-bearded, widemouthedlongheaded, deepvoiced, bareknedhairylegged, ruddyfaced, sinewyarmed hero;

Gerard Manely Hopkins: darksome burn, horseback brown, rollrock highroad, roaring down, windpuff-bonnet of fawn-frothand, twindles over the broth;

Orwell: New language: the B vocabulary comprises only compound words: doublethink, goodthink, oldthink, crimethink, oldspeak, speakwrite, thoughtcrime, sexcrime, prolefeed, dayorder, blackwhite, duckspeak....

 

A few more words here: 

Superman - Thomas Common in 1909 translated from German "Thus Spake Zarathustra" by Friedrich Nietzsche about new man which would live by his own rules. The word "Ubermensch" was transleted as "superman,” use terminology of George Bernard Shaw’s play "Man and Superman" 1903;

Blatant: coined 1596 by Edmund Spenser in "The Faerie Queen," in blatant beast, a thousand-tongued monster representing slander;

Robot: 1923, from English translation of 1920 play "R.U.R." ("Rossum's Universal Robots"), by Karel Capek, from Czech robotnik "forced worker";

Cyberspace: digital technology, - coined by science fiction writer William Gibson in 1982;

Serendipity: happy acciden, unexpected discovery, fortunate chance;  first noted by Horace Walpole on 28 January 1754 in a letter he wrote to his friend Horace Mann;

Doublethink: "power of holding two contradictory beliefs in one's mind simultaneously, and accepting both of them" - George Orwell in "Nineteen Eighty-Four";

Chortle: coined 1871 by Lewis Carroll in "Through the Looking Glass," - chuckle and snort;

Cloud cuckoo land: imaginary city built in air, 1830, translating Aristophanes' Nephelokokkygia in "The Birds". Cloud-land "place above the earth or away from the practical things of life, dreamland, the realm of fancy" is attested from 1840;

Yahoo: a brute in human form in "Gulliver's Travels" by Jhonatan Swift's in 1726, also a philistine; a lout; a hooligan. The internet search engine so called from 1994.

Nerd: firstly this word from book "If I Ran the Zoo" by Dr. Seuss in 1950 - "stupid or crazy person," secondary – American students slang;

Grok: created american science fiction writer Robert A. Heinlein "Stranger in a Strange Land" in 1961; meaning: "to understand empathically";

Utopia: coined by Thomas More in 1516 literally "Nowhere," used as title of his book;

Pandemonium:  invented John Milton in the "Paradise Lost" in 1667. Transferred sense "place of uproar and disorder", "wild, lawless confusion";

Nymphet: invented Vladimir Nabokov in his book "Lolita" meaning: a sexually attractive young girl and precocious girl or young woman";

Here are only a small part of the all words that been had created by people.

 

Sourses:

Online Etimology dictionary - https://www.etymonline.com/word/nerd

Vikipedia - https://en.wikipedia.org

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Miss nothing, read everything!

"To know and not to know, to be conscious of complete truthfulness while telling carefully constructed lies, to hold simultaneously two opinions which cancelled out, knowing them to be contradictory and believing in both of them,.. Even to understand the word - doublethink - involved the use of doublethink." - "Nineteen Eighty-Four" George Orwell.

Words in our life are of great and tremendous value. We show our inner world (soul) and shape our outer (outside) world by words. 

What are we doing when us not enough words so that to reveal your soul for other people? 

Some of us so brave that create new words! 

How new words are formed? 

The our world changes quickly and in our languages new words appeared.

All languages must to express new concepts and things. 

People who lived before Christ have not of the mobile phone and did not need such word.

People was created new words when they was need it

"E.g. suddenly there is an object or a phenomenon that did not exist before. It needs a name because people do not want to use long sentences to describe it. Coffee feels easier than a hot beverage from Arabian lands that makes you energetic and happy.” https://www.quora.com/Why-are-new-words-created

The scientists-linguistics talks that a majority of the words used in English today are of foreign origin. 

A neologism (niːˈɒlədʒɪzəm; from Greek νέο- néo-, new and λόγος lógos, speech, utterance) is a relatively recent or isolated term, word, or phrase which fully accepted into mainstream language and gradually transformed into a real-life "linguistic being.”

Neologisms are usually introduced when it is found that a specific notion is lacking a term, or when the existing vocabulary lacks detail, or when a speaker is unaware of the existing vocabulary. 

A lot of writers use neologisms in their art. 

New words appear on the basis of already existing words and morphemes as a rule


So who decides to live or not to live new words in real world? 

The speakers do, of course! 

The speakers will decide what words will be acceptable.


Here are some of the creators of new words (here are some words):

People talks that William Shakespeare created many new words.

When he was need for some word, he invented it.

The Oxford English Dictionary talk that he come up over 1000 words.

Some of words that Shakespeare invented are foppish, dewdrop, lacklustre, swagger, hint, critic, lonely, base, proud, shallow, beggarly, three-suited-pound, filthy woosted-stocking, a lilly-livered, action-taking, glasse-gazing, super-seruiceable, rogue and many-many others;

John Milton gave us lovelorn, fragrance, pandemonium, debauchery, terrific, healthy etc;

Geoffrey Chaucer: universe, approach;

Ben Jonson: rant, petulant;

John Donne: self-preservation, valediction;

Thomas More: atonement, anticipate, utopia;

Murray Gell-Mann: quark;

Kayla Newman: fleek;

Joycean Ulysses: broadshouldered, deepchested, stronglimbed, frankeyedfreely, freckled, shaggy-bearded, widemouthedlongheaded, deepvoiced, bareknedhairylegged, ruddyfaced, sinewyarmed hero;

Gerard Manely Hopkins: darksome burn, horseback brown, rollrock highroad, roaring down, windpuff-bonnet of fawn-frothand, twindles over the broth;

Orwell: New language: the B vocabulary comprises only compound words: doublethink, goodthink, oldthink, crimethink, oldspeak, speakwrite, thoughtcrime, sexcrime, prolefeed, dayorder, blackwhite, duckspeak....

 

A few more words here: 

Superman - Thomas Common in 1909 translated from German "Thus Spake Zarathustra" by Friedrich Nietzsche about new man which would live by his own rules. The word "Ubermensch" was transleted as "superman,” use terminology of George Bernard Shaw’s play "Man and Superman" 1903;

Blatant: coined 1596 by Edmund Spenser in "The Faerie Queen," in blatant beast, a thousand-tongued monster representing slander;

Robot: 1923, from English translation of 1920 play "R.U.R." ("Rossum's Universal Robots"), by Karel Capek, from Czech robotnik "forced worker";

Cyberspace: digital technology, - coined by science fiction writer William Gibson in 1982;

Serendipity: happy acciden, unexpected discovery, fortunate chance;  first noted by Horace Walpole on 28 January 1754 in a letter he wrote to his friend Horace Mann;

Doublethink: "power of holding two contradictory beliefs in one's mind simultaneously, and accepting both of them" - George Orwell in "Nineteen Eighty-Four";

Chortle: coined 1871 by Lewis Carroll in "Through the Looking Glass," - chuckle and snort;

Cloud cuckoo land: imaginary city built in air, 1830, translating Aristophanes' Nephelokokkygia in "The Birds". Cloud-land "place above the earth or away from the practical things of life, dreamland, the realm of fancy" is attested from 1840;

Yahoo: a brute in human form in "Gulliver's Travels" by Jhonatan Swift's in 1726, also a philistine; a lout; a hooligan. The internet search engine so called from 1994.

Nerd: firstly this word from book "If I Ran the Zoo" by Dr. Seuss in 1950 - "stupid or crazy person," secondary – American students slang;

Grok: created american science fiction writer Robert A. Heinlein "Stranger in a Strange Land" in 1961; meaning: "to understand empathically";

Utopia: coined by Thomas More in 1516 literally "Nowhere," used as title of his book;

Pandemonium:  invented John Milton in the "Paradise Lost" in 1667. Transferred sense "place of uproar and disorder", "wild, lawless confusion";

Nymphet: invented Vladimir Nabokov in his book "Lolita" meaning: a sexually attractive young girl and precocious girl or young woman";

Here are only a small part of the all words that been had created by people.

 

Sourses:

Online Etimology dictionary - https://www.etymonline.com/word/nerd

Vikipedia - https://en.wikipedia.org

 
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